Moisture

what is moisture in foods ?

Food moisture analysis involves the whole coverage of the food items in the world because foods are comprising a considerable amount of water rather than other ingredients. Foods are vital components which are consumed by the people at each and every moment for the surviving in the world. Basically there are several kinds of foods are available for the consumption as raw foods, processed foods and modified foods in the market.

About Moisture in Foods

Moisture content influences the taste, texture, weight, appearance, and shelf life of foodstuffs. Even a slight deviation from a defined standard can adversely impact the physical properties of a food material. For example, substances which are too dry could affect the consistency of the end product. Conversely, excess moisture may cause food material to agglomerate or become trapped in the piping systems during production. Also, the rate of microbial growth increases with total water content, possibly resulting in spoiled batches that need to be disposed of. However, water is also an inexpensive ingredient adding to the weight of the final product. Hence, obtaining an optimal analytical value for moisture is of great economic importance to a food manufacturer. For these reasons, food analysts engage in the delicate balancing of moisture and total solids to ensure consistent product quality, safety, and profitability.

Benifits of Moisture Food to human Body

Water Protects Your Tissues, Spinal Cord, and Joints

Water does more than just quench your thirst and regulate your body’s temperature; it also keeps the tissues in your body moist. You know how it feels when your eyes, nose, or mouth gets dry? Keeping your body hydrated helps it retain optimum levels of moisture in these sensitive areas, as well as in the blood, bones, and the brain. In addition, water helps protect the spinal cord, and it acts as a lubricant and cushion for your joints.

Water Helps Your Body Remove Waste

Adequate water intake enables your body to excrete waste through perspiration, urination, and defecation. The kidneys and liver use it to help flush out waste, as do your intestines. Water can also keep you from getting constipated by softening your stools and helping move the food you’ve eaten through your intestinal tract. However, it should be noted that there is no evidence to prove that increasing your fluid intake will cure constipation.

Water Aids in Digestion

Digestion starts with saliva, the basis of which is water. Digestion relies on enzymes that are found in saliva to help break down food and liquid and to dissolve minerals and other nutrients. Proper digestion makes minerals and nutrients more accessible to the body. Water is also necessary to help you digest soluble fiber. With the help of water, this fiber dissolves easily and benefits your bowel health by making well-formed, soft stools that are easy to pass.

Water Prevents You From Becoming Dehydrated

Your body loses fluids when you engage in vigorous exercise, sweat in high heat, or come down with a fever or contract an illness that causes vomiting or diarrhea. If you’re losing fluids for any of these reasons, it’s important to increase your fluid intake so that you can restore your body’s natural hydration levels. Your doctor may also recommend that you drink more fluids to help treat other health conditions, like bladder infections and urinary tract stones. If you’re pregnant or nursing, you may want to consult with your physician about your fluid intake because your body will be using more fluids than usual, especially if you’re breastfeeding.

Dehydration is a deficiency of water in the body.

  • Vomiting, diarrhea, excessive sweating, burns, kidney failure, and use of diuretics may cause dehydration.
  • People feel thirsty, and as dehydration worsens, they may sweat less and excrete less urine.If dehydration is severe, people may be confused or feel light-headed.
  • Treatment is restoring lost water and mineral salts (such as sodium and potassium) that are dissolved in the blood (electrolytes), usually by drinking but sometimes with intravenous fluids.

Dehydration occurs when the body loses more water than it takes in. Vomiting, diarrhea, the use of drugs that increase urine excretion (diuretics), profuse sweating (for example, during heat waves, particularly with prolonged exertion), and decreased water intake can lead to dehydration.

At first, dehydration stimulates the thirst center of the brain, causing thirst, a powerful motivator for people to drink more fluids. If water intake does not keep up with water loss, dehydration becomes more severe. Sweating decreases, and less urine is excreted. Water moves from inside the cells to the bloodstream to maintain the needed amount of blood (blood volume) and blood pressure. If dehydration continues, tissues of the body begin to dry out, and cells begin to shrivel and malfunction.

Symptoms of mild to moderate dehydration include

  • Thirst
  • Reduced sweating
  • Reduced skin elasticity
  • Reduced urine production
  • Dry mouth
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