Food and nutrition Composition

Nutritive value of Vegetables

  • Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke.
  • Eating a diet rich in some vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may protect against certain types of cancers.
  • Diets rich in foods containing fiber, such as some vegetables and fruits, may reduce the risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.
  • Eating vegetables and fruits rich in potassium as part of an overall healthy diet may lower blood pressure, and may also reduce the risk of developing kidney stones and help to decrease bone loss.
  • Eating foods such as vegetables that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake.
  • Most vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. None have cholesterol. (Sauces or seasonings may add fat, calories, and/or cholesterol.)
  • Vegetables are important sources of many nutrients, including potassium, dietary fiber, folate (folic acid), vitamin A, and vitamin C.
  • Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Vegetable sources of potassium include sweet potatoes, white potatoes, white beans, tomato products (paste, sauce, and juice), beet greens, soybeans, lima beans, spinach, lentils, and kidney beans.
  • Dietary fiber from vegetables, as part of an overall healthy diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as vegetables help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.
  • Folate (folic acid) helps the body form red blood cells. Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant should consume adequate folate from foods, and in addition 400 mcg of synthetic folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. This reduces the risk of neural tube defects, spina bifida, and anencephaly during fetal development.
  • Vitamin A keeps eyes and skin healthy and helps to protect against infections.
  • Vitamin C helps heal cuts and wounds and keeps teeth and gums healthy. Vitamin C aids in iron absorption.

Nutritive value of Fruits

  • Eating a diet rich in fruit may reduce risk for stroke, other cardiovascular diseases and type-2 diabetes.
  • A fruit containing eating pattern is part of an overall healthy diet and may protect against certain cancers.
  • Fruit helps maintain optimum health due to the health promoting phytochemicals it contains – many of which are still being identified.
  • One to 2-1/2 cups of fruit are recommended each day, depending on how many calories you need.
  • Most fruits are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. None have cholesterol.
  • Fruits are sources of many essential nutrients that are underconsumed, including potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and folate (folic acid).
  • Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Fruit sources of potassium include bananas, prunes and prune juice, dried peaches and apricots, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, and orange juice.
  • Dietary fiber from fruits, as part of an overall healthy diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as fruits help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories. Whole or cut-up fruits are sources of dietary fiber; fruit juices contain little or no fiber.
  • Vitamin C is important for growth and repair of all body tissues, helps heal cuts and wounds, and keeps teeth and gums healthy.
  • Folate (folic acid) helps the body form red blood cells. Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant should consume adequate folate from foods, and in addition 400 mcg of synthetic folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. This reduces the risk of neural tube defects, spina bifida, and anencephaly during fetal development.

Nutritive value of cereals

Cereals are probably the greatest source of energy for humans. Providing almost 30% of total calories in a regular diet, cereals are probably the most widely consumed caloric food in America. This percentage rises in places like rural Africa and Asia where cereals are reported to supply almost 70 to 80% of energy requirements (since people in these regions cannot afford to eat other food products like fruits, vegetables, meat, or milk products. Cereals are inexpensive and a widely available source of energy; this is probably the prime reason why people from all budgets prefer cereals as the major energy provider in their diet. Cereal intake tends to be quite high amongst poor income families as they attain a good amount of energy through minimal expenditure.

Source of nutrients: Apart from providing essential nutrients in daily diet, there are several other health benefits of cereals. These health benefits of cereals can be attribute to presence of various vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals.  However these health benefits of cereals are more profound in whole grains rather than refined cereals.

Source of phytonutrients: Whole grains are good source of phytoestrogens which are also present in Soyabeans. This plant compound helps lower cholesterol level in body, increase blood vessel elasticity, aid various cellular metabolic activities.

Dietary fibers: Cereals are rich source of dietary fibers. These fibers are essential for bowel movements. Cereal fibre are also much more effective in preventing heart attack as compared to fruit fibers. Regularly eating cereals like oats provide body soluble fibers which reduce cholesterol in body.

Diabetes: Glycemic index and diabetes are closely linked. Whole cereal food which are slowly digested, low glycemic index and high in soluble fiber helps prevent non insulin dependant diabetes.

Weight loss: Cereals are naturally low in fat and with high fibers are less energy dense. Hence consumption of cereals, mainly sprouted cereals help in weight loss. With low glycemic index they provide feeling of fullness, and discourage overeating.

Nutritive value of Greens

Improved circulation

Improved gall bladder, liver, and kidney function

Helps clear congestion, especially in lungs by reducing mucus

Promotes a healthy intestinal flora

Blood purification

Cancer Prevention

Leaf vegetables are typically low in calories and fat, and high in protein per calorie, dietary fiber, vitamin C, pro-vitamin A carotenoids, folate, manganese and vitamin K. The vitamin K content of leaf vegetables is particularly high, since these are photosynthetic tissues and phylloquinone is involved in photosynthesis.Accordingly, users of vitamin K antagonist medications, such as warfarin, must take special care to limit consumption of leaf vegetables

When it comes to nutrition, leafy greens are rock stars — they top the charts in vitamins A, C and K, potassium and fiber with only 5 to 40 calories per cup. Cruciferous vegetables such as kale, collards and cabbages are natural defenders recognized for their potential roles in cancer prevention. Kale, spinach and turnip greens are high in lutein, a phytochemical that may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

Nutritive value of pulses

Good for Your Heart

Including more pulses in your diet may lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. Pulses are high in fiber. For example, a 1 cup serving of cooked lentils contains more than 15 g of fiber, meeting 60 percent of your daily value.

Lower Risk of Diabetes

Pulses are a low-glycemic index food. The glycemic index ranks food on how it affects your blood sugar. Foods with a low glycemic index cause only a small rise in blood sugar, while foods with a high glycemic index cause a spike in blood sugar

High in Protein

Pulses also make a healthy and inexpensive source of protein. Most pulses do not provide all of the essential amino acids, making them an incomplete source of protein. But if you include other grains and vegetables in your diet, you should be able to meet all of your amino acid needs.

Source of Protein

Typically, pulses contain twice the amount of protein found in whole grain cereals like wheat, oats, barley and rice. Pulses have higher amounts of the essential amino acid lysine whereas cereals have higher amounts of the essential amino acids methionine and cysteine, so blending pulses with cereals or nuts results in a better quality protein that contains all essential amino acids in appropriate amounts. This is particularly important for people eating vegetarian or vegan diets.

High in Fibre

Pulses are very high in fibre, and contain both soluble and insoluble fibre. While soluble fibre helps to decrease blood cholesterol levels and control blood sugar levels, insoluble fibre helps with digestion and regularity.

Nutrient Rich

Pulses provide substantial amounts of vitamins and minerals including iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc. Pulses are also abundant in B vitamins including folate, thiamin and niacin.

Nutritive value of Roots & Tubers

Root Vegetables Nutrition – Health Benefits and Vitamins
Root Vegetables offer significant health benefits as they are packed full of nutritional goodness. Root vegetables contain a whole host of vitamins, including a range of B vitamins, as well as other vitamins such as A and C. The vitamin and nutrient variation will depend on each individual root vegetables, for more details about a specific vegetable, please refer to the main index where you will find an A-Z listing of the most popular veggies and the health benefits that they provide.

Root vegetables are easy and quick to cook, they help to form the main part of a healthy meal and should be eaten on a regular basis. Their nutritional value of root veggies is outstanding and can benefit our health and lifestyles tremendously.

Root vegetables are truly natural, unadulterated sources of complex carbohydrates, antioxidants and important nutrients. Plus, they tend to be lower in calories, have a lower glycemic index load, and cause less digestive or inflammatory issues than many grains do. While their exact nutrition content differs between various types, most root veggies have about 50–100 calories per ½-cup cooked serving and three or more grams of fiber. This makes them a nutrient-dense choice and a preferred way to add starch and sweetness to your diet naturally.

strong evidence exists that some of the vital nutrients found in many root vegetables — including vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, magnesium and dietary fiber — can help fight cancer, diabetes, obesity, and inflammatory-based disorders like heart disease and arthritis.

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