Exercise

Simple Exercise(at home)

Simple exercises to do at home to burn fat and lose weight. Body weight workout for beginners to tone the entire body and blast calories. Do this fitness training 4/5 times a week to get quick results.

Eye Exercise

We all know how important it is to keep our bodies fit by keeping active and maintaining a regular exercise routine. But, did you know that you can exercise your eyes as well? Eye exercises are designed to strengthen your eye muscles, improve focusing, eye movements, and stimulate the vision center of your brain. While there is no scientific proof that eye exercises will improve your eyesight, they may help to counteract existing eye problems you may have and maintain your current eyesight leve

Massage your eyes. This will help to improve blood circulation around your eyes and face, and prepare your eyes for exercise.

  • Apply a hot and cold compress: Soak a towel in warm water, and a towel in cold water. Place the warm towel on your face, making sure it drapes over your eyebrows, closed eyelids, and cheeks. After three minutes, remove the warm towel and place the cold towel on your face. Alternate between the two towels as desired, making sure to end with a cold compress. Alternating temperatures on your face will cause vasoconstriction and vasodilation, physiological changes that will stimulate your face and the skin around your eyes.
  • Do a full face massage: Soak a towel in warm water. Rub your neck, forehead and cheeks with the towel. Then, use your fingertips to gently massage your forehead and closed eyes.
  • Do an eyelid massage: Wash your hands well. Then, close your eyes and massage them with circular movements of your fingers for one to two minutes. Make sure you press very lightly on your eyes as you massage them. Light pressure will help to stimulate your eyes.

Strengthen your eyes’ near and far focusing. This exercise will strengthen the muscles in your eyes and help you maintain your current vision level

  • Sit in a chair or stand in front of a blank wall. Place your thumb about 10 inches in front of your face and focus on it. You can also focus on an object that is five to 10 feet away for 10–15 seconds.
  • Then, focus on an object that is 10–20 feet in front of you without moving your head. Focus on the object for 10–15 seconds.
  • After 10–15 seconds, refocus on your thumb. Practice this five times.

Practice zooming with your eyes. This is a good eye focusing exercise, as you have to constantly adjust how well you can focus on an object from certain distances.

  • Sit in a comfortable position.
  • Stretch out your arm with your thumb in the hitchhiking position (thumbs up).
  • Focus on your thumb. Then, bring the thumb closer to you, focusing until your thumb is about 3 inches in front of your face.
  • Move your thumb away again until your arm is fully outstretched.
  • Repeat this exercise three more times, once a week.
  • You can also practice this exercise by holding a pencil in front of you at arm’s length. Then, move your arm slowly to your nose. Follow the pencil with your eyes until you can’t focus on it any longer.

Do directional eye exercises. Moving your eyes in different directions is a good way to exercise your eyes.

  • Stand or sit upright. Look straight ahead. Without moving your head, look to the left. Focus on what you see. Then look right. Move your eyes side to side five times. Repeat this three times.
  • Without moving your head, look down. Focus on what you see. Then, look up. Focus on what you see. Repeat this three times.
  • Without moving your head, look straight ahead. Then, look down and to the left. Focus on what you see. Then, move your eyes diagonally and look up and to the right. Focus on what you see. Repeat this exercise five times. Then, look straight ahead and do the same exercise looking down and to the right and then looking up and to the left. Repeat this cycle three times.

End your exercises with palming. Always finish up either with palming to relax your eyes after your intense exercise session

  • You can also end your eye workout by simply closing your eyes and keeping them shut in a dark, quiet room for several minutes. Let them cool down and rest.

All Joints Exercise

Flexible joints give us the range of motion that we need to get around in daily life, but that same flexibility can also be a source of weakness and eventual injury. To keep your knees, hips, and shoulders in healthy working order, try one of these exercises to strengthen and stabilize your joints and prevent future pain and injury.

Using only your own body weight, these versatile moves can help you create a total-body workout that fits your needs and abilities. Supermans. Push-up. Contralateral Limb Raises. Bent Knee Push-up. Downward-facing Dog. Bent-Knee Sit-up / Crunches.etc..

Step 1

Starting Position: Lie prone (on your stomach) on a mat with your legs extended, ankles slightly plantarflexed (toes pointing away from your shins), arms extended overhead with palms facing each other. Relax your head to align it with your spine.

Step 2

Upward Phase: Exhale, contract your abdominal and core muscles to stabilize your spine and slowly extend both hips (raise both legs) a few inches off the floor while simultaneously raising both arms a few inches off the floor. Keep both legs and arms extended and avoiding any rotation in each. Maintain your head and torso position, avoiding any arching in your back or raising of your head. Hold this position briefly.

Step 3

Downward Phase: Gently inhale and lower your legs and arms back towards your starting position without any movement in your low back or hips.

Step 1

Starting Position: Kneel on an exercise mat or floor and bring your feet together behind you.

Step 2

Slowly bend forward to place your palms flat on the mat, positioning your hands shoulder-width apart with your fingers facing forward or turned slightly inward. Slowly shift your weight forward until your shoulders are positioned directly over your hands. Reposition your hands as needed to allow full extension of your body without any bend at the hips or knees. Stiffen your torso by contracting your core/abdominal muscles (“bracing”), your glute and quadriceps muscles and align your head with your spine. Place your feet together with your ankles dorsiflexed (toes pointed towards your shins).

Step 3

Downward Phase: Slowly lower your body towards the floor while maintaining a rigid torso and head aligned with your spine. Do not allow your low back to sag or your hips to hike upwards during this downward phase. Continue to lower yourself until your chest or chin touch the mat/floor. Allow your elbows to flare outwards during the lowering phase.

Step 4

Upward Phase: Press upwards through your arms while maintaining a rigid torso and head aligned with your spine. For extra strength think about pushing the floor away from you. Do not allow your low back to sag or your hips to hike upwards. Continue pressing until the arms are fully extended at the elbows.

Step 5

An alternative position is to turn your hands to face forwards and keep your your elbows close to your sides during the downward phase. This shifts the emphasis from the chest muscles onto the triceps and may reduce stresses in the shoulder joint.

Pushing through the heel and outside surface of your palm provides greater force in your press and stability to your shoulders

Step 1

Starting Position: Lie prone (on your stomach) on a mat with your legs extended, ankles slightly plantarflexed (toes pointing away from your shins), arms extended overhead with palms facing each other. Relax your head to align it with your spine.

Step 2

Upward Phase: Exhale, contract your abdominal/core muscles to stabilize your spine and slowly raise one arm a few inches off the floor keeping your arm extended and avoiding any rotation in your arm. Maintain your head and torso position, avoiding any arching in your back or raising of your head. Hold this position briefly.

Step 3

Downward Phase: Gently inhale and lower your arm back towards your starting position without any movement in your low back or hips.

Step 4

Exercise Variation (1): From your starting position, contract your abdominal and core muscles to stabilize your spine and slowly extend one hip (raise one leg) a few inches off the floor keeping your leg extended, ankle plantarflexed (toes pointing away from your shins) and avoiding any rotation in your leg. Maintain your head and torso position, avoiding any arching in your back or raising of your head. Hold this position briefly before returning to your starting position.

Step 5

Exercise Variation(2): From your starting position, contract your abdominal/core muscles to stabilize your spine and slowly extend one hip (raise one leg) a few inches off the floor while simultaneously raising the opposite arm a few inches off the floor. Keep both your leg and arm extended and avoiding any rotation in each. Maintain your head and torso position, avoiding any arching in your back or raising of your head. Hold this position briefly before returning to your starting position

Step 1

Starting Position: Kneel on an exercise mat or floor and bring your feet together behind you.

Step 2

Slowly bend forward to place your palms flat on the mat, positioning your hands shoulder-width apart with your fingers facing forward. Slowly shift your weight forward until your shoulders are positioned directly over your hands. Reposition your hands as needed to allow full extension of your body from the knees without any bend at the hips. Stiffen your torso by contracting your core and abdominal muscles (“bracing”).

Step 3

Downward Phase: Slowly lower your body towards the floor while maintaining a rigid torso and head aligned with your spine. Do not allow your low back to sag or your hips to hike upwards during this downward phase. Continue to lower yourself until your chest or chin touch the mat or floor. Your elbows should remain close to the sides of your body or flare outwards slightly.

Step 4

Upward Phase: Press upwards through your arms while maintaining a rigid torso and head aligned with your spine. Do not allow your low back to sag or your hips to hike upwards. Continue pressing until the arms are fully extended at the elbows.

Push-ups place stress upon the wrist joints. To alleviate some of this stress you may opt to use dumbbells and grip the handles rather than place your hands on the floor. If your are pressing from an elevation such as a dumbbell, you do not need to lower your chest or chin to the floor, but rather lower yourself until your chest or chin are level with the dumbbell handles.

Step 1

Starting Position: Kneel on an exercise mat or floor and bring your feet together behind you. Slowly bend forward to place your palms flat on the mat, positioning your hands shoulder-width apart with your fingers facing forward. Slowly lift yourself into a push-up position, shifting your hands until your shoulders are positioned directly over your hands. Reposition your feet as needed to allow full extension of your body. Stiffen your torso by contracting your core and abdominal muscles to prevent any arching in your low back or hiking of your hips towards the ceiling.

Step 2

Upward Phase: While maintaining a rigid torso and full extension in your arms and legs, slowly exhale and shift your weight backwards by pushing your hips backwards and upwards. Maintain your head alignment with your spine, but slowly move your head between your shoulders as your body moves backwards and attempt to push your heels towards the floor. Maintain the stiffness in your torso to prevent the tendency of your back to arch. Continue moving until your body forms an inverted-V, keeping both arms and legs extended and a neutral (flat) spine. Allow a slight bend in the knees if required to achieve the inverted-V position.

Step 3

Downward Phase: Inhale and return your body to the starting push-up position, maintaining the alignment of all your body segments.

Step 1

Starting Position: Lie in a supine (on your back) position on a mat with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor and heels 12 – 18″ from your tailbone.

Step 2

Place your hands behind your head, squeezing your scapulae (shoulder blades) together and pulling your elbows back without arching your low back. This elbow position should be maintained throughout the exercise. Align your head with your spine, but allow it to move into slight flexion (moving the chin towards the chest) during the upward phase of the exercise.

Step 3

Upward Phase: Exhale, contract your abdominal and core muscles and flex your chin slightly towards your chest while slowly curling your torso towards your thighs. The movement should focus on pulling your rib cage towards your pelvis (the neck stays relaxed while the chin is tucked towards the neck). Your feet, tailbone and lower back should remain in contact with the mat at all times. Continue curling up until your upper back is lifted off the mat. Hold this position briefly.

Step 4

Downward Phase: Gently inhale and slowly uncurl (lower) your torso back towards the mat in a controlled fashion keeping your feet, tailbone and low back in contact with the mat.

Proper form is important for this exercise to prevent excessive stress on your low back. Individuals usually perform this movement too rapidly and recruit the hip flexors to assist with the upward phase. This technique tilts the pelvis anteriorly, increasing the stress on the low back and should be avoided. The abdominals connect the rib cage to the pelvis so the movement should focus on bringing these two body parts closer together while keeping the neck and shoulders relaxed.

Belly dance Exercise At Home

Get your hips moving with this belly dancing for beginners home workout video from the Health Life, where you can find a range of workout routines to suit you, whether your aim is to lose weight, improve your overall fitness, or de-stress.

Tight skin exercise (at home)

Sometimes when you lose weight you also gain loose skin. This problem most often develops in your face, neck, under arms, abdomen and thighs. Some exercises can help to tighten these areas. Each exercise is designed to not only tighten the skin but also to tone and firm your muscles, which also reduces the appearance of sagging loose skin.

Loose skin on your neck gives the appearance of a double chin. Doing exercises that focus on this area of the body tones and tightens the muscles, which eliminates the appearance of sagging skin. To begin one easy exercise, stand with your arms at your side. Tilt your head back until you are looking directly at the ceiling. Do not strain your neck. Open your mouth and close it, slowly touching your teeth together. You can feel a slight pull on the muscles of your chin. Repeat this exercise five to 10 times per day for optimum results.

As you lose weight, the skin under your arms becomes loose and sags. Overhead stretches help to tone this troublesome area. Simply sit comfortably with your back straight. Hold one dumbbell in each hand, resting them down at your sides. Raise your arms straight out in front of you with your palms facing inward. Slowly lift the dumbbells straight up so they are above your head. Bend your elbows; your hands should be behind your ears. Hold for five to 10 seconds and lower your arms. Do 10 to 12 reps every other day.

Exercises such as crunches tighten and tone the muscles in your abdomen to help trim unwanted skin. Perform a basic crunch by lying on your back with your knees bent at a 90-degree angle. Interlock your fingers and place them behind your head. Without bending your neck, slowly raise your head and upper back off the floor. Hold for five seconds and return to your starting position. Repeat 10 to 20 times.

Excess skin may accumulate on your inner thighs. To address the saggy appearance, lay on your left side with your left leg straight and your right leg bent at a 90-degree angle and in front of your left leg. Prop yourself up on your elbow. Keeping your left leg straight, slowly raise it until you feel a slight pull in your inner thigh. Hold for five seconds and return to your starting position. Repeat 10 times and move to your left leg.

Waking

Walking is a basic movement we use every day, but it can require discipline to walk enough to gain health benefits. It’s recommended that individuals take at least 10,000 steps each day for exercise, which can be easily measured by a pedometer. Other fitness watches and smart phone devices could also be used. Read on for other tips on starting a walking regimen.

Pick an easy first walk. Make sure that no matter how far you get from your starting point, you are able to get back there. Walking on an oval track no more than a quarter mile around should be perfect.

Set a time. When you first start walking, decide how many minutes you will walk. Choose a length of time you know you can make. Do not worry about how short that period is. Just keep moving until you reach it. 2-5 minutes each day is a good start. That time will increase from week to week.

Increase your time. Each walk, increase your walking time by 30 seconds to 1 minute until you are able to sustain a 10-minute walk. Again, do not fret if you can’t go longer than the day before. Set the goal and keep at it and you will reach it faster than you think. After reaching 10 minutes, your rate of increasing may slow, but continue trying to increase your walking time by 5 minutes each week

Work on speed and difficulty after you are able to walk for 45 minutes each day. Try moving off of the oval and onto the city streets; you will encounter hills and declines, and that will increase the difficulty of your walk.

Breathing Exercise

Since breathing is something we can control and regulate, it is a useful tool for achieving a relaxed and clear state of mind. I recommend three breathing exercises and techniques to help relax and reduce stress: The Stimulating BreathThe 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise (also called the Relaxing Breath), and Breath Counting. Try each of these breathing exercises and techniques and see how they affect your stress and anxiety levels.

The Stimulating Breath (also called the Bellows Breath)

The Stimulating Breath is adapted from yogic breathing techniques. Its aim is to raise vital energy and increase alertness.

The 4-7-8 (or Relaxing Breath) Exercise

The 4-7-8 breathing exercise is utterly simple, takes almost no time, requires no equipment and can be done anywhere. Although you can do the exercise in any position, sit with your back straight while learning the exercise. Place the tip of your tongue against the ridge of tissue just behind your upper front teeth, and keep it there through the entire exercise. You will be exhaling through your mouth around your tongue; try pursing your lips slightly if this seems awkward.

Breath Counting 

Sit in a comfortable position with the spine straight and head inclined slightly forward. Gently close your eyes and take a few deep breaths. Then let the breath come naturally without trying to influence it. Ideally it will be quiet and slow, but depth and rhythm may vary.

Diabetes Exercise(at home)

Excess weight can be taxing on wrists while doing push-ups, but wall push-ups work the same muscles, without all of the wrist strain.

  • Place your hands shoulder-width apart firmly on the wall.
  • Take a few steps back until you are at a slight incline.
  • Keeping your elbows close to your body, rather than pushing them out like you would on a floor push-up, lower until your nose touches the wall.
  • Extend back to starting position, and begin again.

As your strength increases, try moving to regular push-ups, starting with your knees down if necessary.

  • Stand with your feet hip-width apart, with your weight spread evenly on your feet.
  • Begin bending your knees to lower yourself while keeping your chest up.
  • Your hands may reach up towards the sky to help with balance, or can be placed on your hips.
  • Try and get as low as you can, aiming for your knee to create a 90 degree angle.
  • Then stand back up to starting position. Repeat.

As your strength increases, try doing a knee lift in between every squat, alternating knees each time.

  • Standing with your feet a little wider than hip-width distance apart, extend your arms out, so you make an “T” shape.
  • Begin making very small circles with your arms, while keeping your arms straight.
  • After 30 seconds, switch directions.

As your strength increases, try adding light weights while you’re doing the circles and increasing the time for each direction.

  • Place your hands on your hips and your feet close together.
  • Step forward with your right foot, and while bending your front knee, lower until your front knee is a 90-degree angle, and your back knee almost touches the ground.
  • Step your right foot back to starting position.
  • Step forward with your left foot and repeat.

As your strength increases, try adding light weights as you lunge.

Complete each movement as many times as possible for a minute, then switch. Aim for three rounds.

Meditation

This meditation exercise is an excellent introduction to meditation techniques.

  1. Sit or lie comfortably. You may even want to invest in a meditation chair or cushion.
  2. Close your eyes. We recommend using one of our Cooling Eye Masks or Restorative Eye Pillows if lying down.
  3. Make no effort to control the breath; simply breathe naturally.
  4. Focus your attention on the breath and on how the body moves with each inhalation and exhalation. Notice the movement of your body as you breathe. Observe your chest, shoulders, rib cage, and belly. Simply focus your attention on your breath without controlling its pace or intensity. If your mind wanders, return your focus back to your breath.

Maintain this meditation practice for two to three minutes to start, and then try it for longer periods.

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